Announcements

NSBRI First Award Fellowship Program Soliciting Applications

The application period for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute's (NSBRI) First Award Fellowship Program is now open. One-year fellowships are available to pursue research in any U.S. laboratory conducting space-related biomedical or biotechnological research. 

NSBRI’s First Award Fellowship Program allows future space life scientists, engineers, and physicians to train as independent investigators with one year of support at universities, research institutes, government laboratories, or commercial entities nationwide.

Fellowships enable young scientists to manage their own space-related biomedical research projects while continuing to learn from experienced faculty mentors. The program serves as a mechanism to strengthen the high-tech workforce of the future, with alumni of the program having successfully transitioned into positions within academia, industry, or government. 
Applicants are required to submit proposals with the support of a mentor and an institution, and all proposals will be evaluated by a scientific peer-review panel. Selected applicants receive a stipend, allowance for health insurance, and travel funds for related scientific meetings. This year's applicants can potentially spend part of their fellowship in Russia, via the NSBRI-Institute of Biomedical Problems  (IBMP) International Postdoctoral Exchange Program.

Detailed program and application submission information is available at: www.nsbri.org/FUNDING-OPPORTUNITIES/Current-Announcements/. The application deadline is June 5, 2015 at 5 p.m. EST. Questions may be directed to Dr. Amanda Smith Hackler at hackler@bcm.edu or 713-798-3013. For additional information about NSBRI's First Award Fellowship Program please visit:  http://www.nsbri.org/firstaward/.

NSBRI is a 501(c)3 organization funded by NASA. Its mission is to lead a national program to mitigate the health risks related to human spaceflight and to apply the discoveries to improve life on Earth. Annually, the Institute's science, technology, and education projects take place at approximately 60 institutions and companies across the United States. For more information, please visit www.nsbri.org.


66th International Astronautical Congress (IAC 2015)

The IAC is the one place and time of the year when all space actors come together. Global, multidisciplinary and covering all space sectors and topics, it offers everyone the latest space information, developments but above all contacts and potential partnerships. Each year, the IAC changes country, theme and local organizer, enabling all to learn more about, and be a part of the world space scene.


AMHP Journal Pages Redesigned

Check out the new journal website! Click on the journal tab (above right) to see our new design. We hope this will make it easier to find links for submitting articles, subscribing, and reading the journal.
Your feedback is welcome. Contact pday@asma.org.


Macias Wins 2014 Fellows Scholarship

The AsMA Fellows Scholarship Committee is pleased to announce their selection of the winner of the 2014 scholarship.  Brandon Richard Macias, Ph.D. won the scholarship for his presentation and publication of a manuscript on "Intraocular and Intracranial Pressures during Head-Down-Tilt with Lower Body Negative Pressure”.  
 
The $2,000 AsMA Fellows Scholarship is funded by the AsMA Foundation and is presented annually to an AsMA member who is a student in an aerospace medicine residency program, graduate program in aerospace medicine (Master or Ph.D.), medical certificate or aerospace diploma course, or in a full time education/training program in the allied fields of nursing, physiology, human factors, psychology, ergonomics, and engineering.  Selection criteria include delivering a slide or poster presentation as a first author at the AsMA Annual Scientific Meeting and then submitting a manuscript as first author for publication in Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine based on the same topic and/or material covered in the slide or poster presentation.   The winner is selected by the AsMA Fellows Scholarship Committee based on the high scientific value, originality, quality and relevance of the candidates' presentations and published manuscripts.


Aeromedical Lessons Learned from Columbia Shuttle Mishap

Reflecting current efforts and understanding, Loss of Signal aims to present the story of Columbia from an aerospace medical angle, focusing holistically on what is important for future investigations and analysis of spacecraft mishaps. This book is written by those who participated in the crew recovery and analysis and is written from their first-hand perspective of the events. The loss of a human crew implies sensitivities that must be balanced against the public and industry need to know, with the guiding principle being prevention of further mishaps and enhanced protection for crewmembers.

Learn more here.