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Holland Installed as LSBEB President

May 23, 2018

Holland Installed as LSBEB President

Dwight A. Holland, M.D., Ph.D., is beginning a 1-year term as the President of the Life Sciences and Engineering Branch (LSBEB).

   He is the Past President of the International Association of Military Flight Surgeon Pilots, the Space Medicine Association, and the Aerospace Human Factors Association. He has been doing consulting on and off in Systems Management/Human Factors Engineering since 1990 as time permitted from his military and other academic pursuits. He served in the USAF Reserve on/off active/reserve duty as an Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA) for about 15 years in a wide variety of positions with both Company Grade and Field Grade Officer of the Year honors in his status at the USAF Office for Scientific Research as a dual-hatted International Office Program Manager (AFOSR/IO)/USN Test Pilot School Academic Instructor, and at Edwards AFB, CA, in the USAF Test Pilot School. His last USAF IMA Reserve assignment was as the Senior Reservist (IMA) the Warfighter Readiness Division in the 711 Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH.
   Dr. Holland holds Master’s degrees in Geophysics, Systems Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Human Factors and Systems Engineering, all from Virginia Tech. He is also a graduate of USAF Pilot Training and was a fully qualified USAF Acquisitions Officer. He holds FAA commercial and multiengine jet type-rated pilot ratings with over 2,000 hours of flight time in 35+ aircraft, including flight test engineering work. His doctorate in Medicine is from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, where he served as the elected Representative by his peers from the School of Medicine to the University of Virginia Honor Committee. He crafted the first joint M.D./Ph.D. between Virginia Tech College of Engineering and the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He also has served early in his career on a Geophysics research expedition to the Antarctic, living in harsh polar conditions in an unheated tent for 3 months, flying in a specially outfitted aircraft from and to remote sites, managing
the team’s Gravity/Magnetics program, and earliest tests of GPS systems for Antarctic scientific positioning study.
   Dr. Holland has served as an instructor and curriculum codeveloper in the crew interface area at the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, MD. He was the first known reserve instructor known to be attached to the school. While at AFOSR/IO as a Program Manager, he served as a liaison to USN Office for Naval Research (ONR) for internationally related bioterrorism issues, and represented AFOSR/AFRL at the by-invitation initial Western Hemisphere Anti-Bioterrorism Conference, and was a key S&T player in the outreach to Slovenia in 2002-2004 as it transitioned to becoming a NATO state at a critical time for the region’s stability. During this time, he was selected by the SecAF/Acquisition team to moderate the high level brain-storming sessions on how to improve the systems engineering processes in the USAF Acquisitions system, and served as the Technical Co-Chair and Senior Governmental leadership organizer for the largest international Systems Engineering held to date.
   Dr. Holland has over 100 academic presentations, abstracts, book reviews, publications, journal special edition, and book as co-author to his credit, including chairing over 50 scientific sessions at various scientific meetings. He served as one of several co-authors and as a research pilot/human factors research design advisor on the AsMA 2005 Tuttle Award research team lead by Dr. Mike Russo, resulting in contributions to related to all-night flying fatigue, and other general fatigue parameters. His dissertation on dynamic peripheral visual acuity under various level of workload and verbal intrusion earned him the 2002 Stanley N. Roscoe Award from the Aerospace Human Factors Association. In the past, he has been awarded the Won Chuel Kay Award for significant contributions to international aerospace medicine, and was more recently recognized by AsMA with the Sidney Leverett Environmental Science Award for his various contributions to Aerospace Systems development, including co-authoring the NASA-sponsored book “Breaking the Mishap Chain (2012)”, which was nominated for the international Airbus Aviation Safety Award and touched on several areas of concern while flight testing new aerospace systems from a Human Systems Integration/Aerospace Medicine perspective. “Breaking the Mishap Chain (2012)” was reviewed by the Smithsonian Air and Space Magazine as a featured “book to buy”. The Leverett Award also noted his co-leading the unique full-coverage G suit flights with prescribed profiles, with full physiological internal and external monitoring while in high-Gz flight in specially outfitted USAF Test Pilot School data jets, after centrifuge build-up. This project was joint across two commands, and multiple offices and the team was nominated for the international Collier Trophy by the USAF Test Pilot School and won several society conference awards/recognition for the team’s research efforts. Dr. Holland was personally nominated by Test Pilot School Staff for the Society of Flight Test Engineers Kelly Johnson Award in 2012 for the “most significant” contribution to flight test engineering internationally. He is a Lifetime member of that organization and several other professional societies.
   Dr. Holland has served on the AsMA Council for many years in the recent past, including Member-at-Large 2014-2017, and Representative from three various organizations prior to that window. He has also served the AsMA community on the Executive Committee, as the Awards Chair for 4 years, and on the AsMA Scientific Program for almost 20 years, with 4 other years in the past as the Book Reviews Editor.