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Gillingham Award - Stephen Véronneau

June 23, 2017

Gillingham Award - Stephen Véronneau

This award was established and sponsored by the AMST Group of Companies in Austria and the United Kingdom to honor the memory of Kent K. Gillingham, M.D., Ph.D. The award is presented annually to an individual who has made a significant contribution in the field of spatial disorientation and situational awareness related to flight.

Stephen Véronneau, M.D., M.S., received the 2017 Kent K. Gillingham Award for his instrumental role establishing high computing technology at the FAA for studies addressing medically disqualifying pathologies focusing on human safety and spatial disorientation. In the photo below, Dr. Véronneau (center) accepts the award from Eric Roedig (right), representing AMST, and David Gradwell (left), AsMA President.
   Dr. Véronneau has been an outstanding member of the aeromedical community since 1988. He has served as a reviewer for the AsMA journal and has authored textbook chapters in accident investigation and spatial disorientation. His spirit of collaboration is unequaled and his knowledge of aerospace medicine is sought after by national and international colleagues.
   Dr. Véronneau championed the development of risk measurements for the FAA’s Safety Management System and the introduction of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies into aeromedical certification decision making processes. He has been very active in supporting the FAA’s aeromedical education programs, including the Space Medicine chapter of the current Clinical Aerospace Physiology Review materials for Aviation Medical Examiners (AMEs). He has taught accident investigation to FAA Accident Investigators, AMEs, and visiting scientists for the last 25 years, and manages the CAMI Advanced Aerospace Medicine Course for International Medical Officers which is coordinated with the USAF. His involvement in academia is extensive and he participated for a decade in the Interagency Committee on Aviation Policy on the Safety and Standards subcommittee providing medical and human factors inputs to the effort to improve safety in public use aircraft. Specific research contributions to the general aviation community addressed the following topics: spatial disorientation, human factors, flying under the influence of alcohol, controlled flight into terrain, incapacitation, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes.
   Dr. Véronneau received his B.S. in 1979 and his M.D. in 1983 from University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. He became Board Certified in Aerospace Medicine by American Board of Preventive Medicine January 1990 and completed his Aerospace Medicine Residency as well as receiving his M.S. from Wright State University later that year.
   Dr. Véronneau has been Manager of the Aerospace Medicine Education Division at the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute since 2015. Prior to that he was a Research Medical Officer with FAA-CAMI from 1990–2014. He is also curently a Clinical Assistant Professor of Community Health at Wright State University, Dayton, OH, as well as Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, and a Member of the Residency Advisory Committee, Mayo Clinic. He has been a Senior AME since 1990 and held a Private Pilot license since 1988. Dr. Véronneau is qualified in Federal court as an expert witness in aeromedical certification, aerospace medicine, and spatial disorientation in General Aviation operations. He has also published innumerable peer review papers and reports and presented at over 200 national and international meetings, seminars, and short courses.