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NIOSH Releases Updated MFIRE Software

September 24, 2020

NIOSH Releases Updated MFIRE Software

Researchers at the Pittsburgh Mining Research Division (PMRD) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) are offering a more accessible program (MFIRE) to simulate fires underground, giving mining engineers a valuable tool to conduct fire emergency planning and to test if ventilation controls can contain a fire.

   Using the MFIRE computer modeling program, users can perform normal ventilation network planning and dynamic underground mine fire and contaminant spread simulation. e program is used for mine fire emergency training and planning and fire risk assessment. Originally released in 1977 as a DOS-based program by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the soware has been completely rewritten in the C++ operating language and packaged into a dynamic link library—meaning it contains code and data that can be used by other programs, making it easy for all mining engineers to adopt. Using MFIRE, engineers can understand where in a mine that smoke and toxic gases could spread, whether designated mine escapeways could be compromised by smoke and toxic gases from the fire, and what ventilation control methods could be used to reduce the fire damage in the event of a mine fire. To access the simulation portion of the soware, users can construct the ventilation network (layout of the airways), then enter ventilation parameters (such as resistances, fan curves, and elevations), and thermal properties for heat transfer. The user can then specify any size of fire at any location of the mine to simulate spread and contamination.
   —Please visit https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-09-21-20.html to read more.