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Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Ethnoracial Differences in Alzheimers

February 26, 2019

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Ethnoracial Differences in Alzheimers

A team of Mayo Clinic researchers found Hispanic-American patients with Alzheimer’s tend to survive significantly longer with the disease than other ethnoracial groups, according to a study in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s
Association
.

   Hispanic-Americans were found to live an average of 12 years with the disease from the time of onset of symptoms. The research team examined 1,625 brain tissue samples and compared the disease progression and duration in individuals who had self-identified as African-American, Hispanic, or non-Hispanic white. The study also compared the presence, location, and composition of Alzheimer’s-related protein clumps, known as tangles, in tissue samples from the Florida Autopsied Multi-Ethnic (FLAME) cohort. The study additionally explored demographic details, such as patients’ education and employment, which are considered to have protective effects against cognitive decline. The findings have prompted the next stage of investigations, looking at factors that may influence survival in Hispanic-American patients. The team will explore psycho-social contributors, such as family support and potential neuro-biologic factors that include protective proteins.
   —Please visit https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/research-finds-ethnoracial-differences-in-alzheimers-disease/ for more on this.