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RAeS Honors Two AsMA Members

December 03, 2020

RAeS Honors Two AsMA Members

The Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) recently recognized several Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) members with awards. These awards recognize individuals and teams, honoring achievement, innovation, and excellence, for exceptional contributions to aerospace.

David G. Newman, D.Av.Med., M.B.A., Ph.D., FRAeS
Dr. Newman was admitted to Honorary Fellowship in recognition of his contributions to the field of aviation over several decades. His research, which is widely cited, covers aerospace medicine, physiology, clinical aviation medicine, aerospace biomechanics, and flight safety. He is currently a Visiting Professor of Aerospace Medicine at King’s College London. Dr. Newman began his career in 1987 as an undergraduate medical officer in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at Monash University in 1989 and, after 2 years as a public hospital intern and surgical resident, he entered full-time service with the RAAF. His first posting was to RAAF Base Point Cook, where he served as the Flight Medicine Officer for No. 1 Flying Training School. This was followed by a tour as Senior Medical Officer at No. 6 RAAF Hospital. In 1994 he was posted to RAAF Base Williamtown for 3 years as a medical officer and then later as the Senior Medical Officer on promotion to Squadron Leader. He was the Flight Medicine Officer for 76 Squadron and, during his time at Williamtown, he completed the USAF Aerospace Medicine Primary Course at Brooks AFB, TX, in 1995.
    In 1997 Dr. Newman was posted to the Royal Air Force School of Aviation Medicine in Farnborough, UK, where he graduated with a Diploma in Aviation Medicine from the Royal College of Physicians of London, and won the Stewart Memorial Prize for the best student. He then spent 7 months as the RAAF Instructor at the Royal Air Force Aviation Medicine Training Centre at RAF North Luffenham. On returning to Australia, he served for 2 years as the Chief Instructor at the RAAF Institute of Aviation Medicine, RAAF Base Edinburgh, South Australia. He left the RAAF in February 2000 and in the same year completed his Ph.D. in aviation physiology. He then served as a Professor of Aviation Medicine at Monash University until taking his current position.
    During his career he has received numerous awards, including the Weary Dunlop Prize of the Australian Military Medicine Association in 1993 and again in 1998. He was honored with the Stewart Memorial Prize from the RAF School of Aviation Medicine in 1997. In 2000 he received the Arnold D. Tuttle award and, in 2014, the John Paul Stapp Award from the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA). He also received the Royal Aeronautical Society’s 2000 Buchanon-Barbour Award. He received the President's Prize from the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine and the A. Howard Hasbrook Award from the Life Sciences and Biomedical Engineering Branch of AsMA, both in 2012. He is a Fellow of the AsMA, where he has also been a member of the Science and Technology Committee since 2002, the Royal Aeronautical Society, and the Australasian College of Aerospace Medicine.
 
Peter A. Hancock, D.Sc., Ph.D., FRAeS
Dr. Hancock was honored with the Roger Green Medal for Human Factors for his significant and continued contributions to Human Factors research and practice in aviation and other fields. His work has covered topics such as automation, mental workload, vigilance, situation awareness, fatigue, accident analysis and prevention, and work design. He is currently Provost Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Psychology, the Institute for Simulation and Training, and the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems at the University of Central Florida. He is also the 16th University Pegasus Professor, the University’s highest honor, and the 6th University Trustee Chair.
    In his previous appointment, Dr. Hancock founded and was the Director of the Human Factors Research Laboratory at the University of Minnesota where he held appointments as Professor in the Departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Psychology, and Kinesiology as well as being a member of the Cognitive Science Center and the Center on Aging Research. He also held an appointment as a Clinical Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology at Minnesota, was an Adjunct Senior Research Scientist at the Transportation Institute of the University of Michigan, and was an affiliated Scientist for the Humans and Automation Laboratory at MIT.  In 2001 he earned a Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) degree from Loughborough University in England.
    In 1999 Professor Hancock was the Arnold Small Lecturer of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and in 2000 he was awarded the Sir Frederic Bartlett Medal by the Ergonomics Society of Great Britain for lifetime scientific achievement. He was the Keynote Speaker for the combined meeting of the International Ergonomics Association and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society in 2000. In 2001 he received the Franklin V. Taylor Award of the American Psychological Association as well as the Liberty Mutual Prize for Occupational Safety and Ergonomics from the International Ergonomics Association.
    In 2002, he was awarded the Jastrzebowski Medal of the Polish Ergonomics Society for contributions to world ergonomics. In 2003 he won the Liberty Mutual Medal of the International Ergonomics Association, a worldwide competition for innovative advances in occupational safety and ergonomics. In 2006 he won the Norbert Wiener Award of the Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). In late 2007 he was the recipient of the John C. Flanagan Award for of the Society of Military Psychologists of the American Psychological Association for lifetime achievement and he was also the 2007 recipient of the A.R. Lauer Award of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society for lifetime contributions to safety. He was honored with the Raymond F. Longacre Award from the Aerospace Medical Association in 2008.
    Professor Hancock has authored over 700 peer reviewed scientific articles and has co-authored over 20 books. He is a multiple-term Member of the National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council’s Committee on Human Factors, and, in that capacity, has served as Chair and Organizer for a number of sub-committees. He is a Fellow and past President of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, a Fellow of the Ergonomics Society of Great Britain, and a Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.