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Moseley Award: Todd Dart

July 05, 2022

Moseley Award: Todd Dart

Established in memory of Col. Harry G. Moseley, USAF, MC, in recognition of his material contributions to flight safety. It is given annually for the most outstanding contribution to flight safety. Sponsored by the International Association of Military Flight Surgeon Pilots.

A white man wearing glasses with dark hair in a white shirt, red tie, and black jacket stands in front of a pale yellow background.Todd S. Dart, Ph.D., is the 2022 recipient of the Harry G. Moseley Award. He was honored for his safety expertise and technical competence. His work in keeping aircrew safe has earned him recognition within the professional aerospace community and he is often the first person contacted for difficult safety issues. He has done extensive hypobaric work, is an experienced U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine academic instructor, and was Human Factors Branch Chief at the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center. He was recognized in 2012 by the F-22 Program Manager for being  instrumental in solving the F-22 hypoxia problem. This allowed those grounded aircraft to be returned to operational flight, a significant achievement. He has played an important role in the testing and evaluation of many aircraft life support systems.
   Dr. Dart is the Aerospace Physiology Research and Test Manager for KBR Government Solutions, Science & Space business unit, located on the former campus of the U.S. Air Force (USAF) School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) at Brooks City-Base in San Antonio, TX. Since joining KBR in 2011 he has managed altitude, thermal, and acceleration test and evaluation for aircraft and personal life support systems and aircrew flight equipment. He has tested life support systems, or served as an aerospace physiology consultant, for the Department of Defense’s F-15, F-18, F-22, F-35, and T-6 aircraft, NASA’s X-59 low boom flight demonstrator, and Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShip 2. When not involved with testing, he supports and conducts centrifuge acceleration and altitude chamber research and training.
   A retired USAF aerospace physiologist, Dr. Dart attended physiological training officer school at Brooks AFB in 1990, remaining on staff after graduation as the officer in charge of the Cockpit and Equipment Integration Laboratory, marking the beginning of a successful career in aircrew life support systems and flight equipment development. Following a tour at Edwards AFB, CA, conducting aircrew physiological training, he returning to Brooks AFB, TX, where he completed the clinical hyperbaric physiology fellowship at the Davis Hyperbaric Laboratory. Upon completion of the fellowship, he worked as the lab’s director of hyperbaric operations and safety. This gave him the opportunity to travel for the inspection and certification of USAF hyperbaric treatment chambers in the United States, Japan, and Panama. Subsequent assignments were to Beale AFB, CA, as the aerospace physiology training flight commander where he managed regional military and FAA physiological training, the U-2 pilot full pressure suit orientation course, and the U-2 water and land survival training programs. This was followed by an assignment to the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center at Kirtland AFB, NM, serving as the aircraft human factors branch chief. Todd’s last military assignment was once again at Brooks City-Base, TX, where he was involved with aircrew fatigue research and education before moving on to altitude research where he managed the investigation of the impact of hypoxia on night vision goggle performance. Retiring from the Air Force in 2008, he became an adjunct biology instructor at Northwest Vista College in San Antonio, TX, teaching courses in biology, ecology, and anatomy and physiology before returning once again to Brooks to work for Wyle, which became KBR in 2016.
   Dr. Dart holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, a Master of Science degree in Biology from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Wildlife and
Fisheries Sciences with emphasis in physiological ecology from Texas A&M University. Todd’s scientific publications explore the effects of hypoxia on psychomotor performance, pulmonary impact of long duration U-2 missions, pressure breathing for G without use of upper pressure garments on acceleration performance, and hypoxia prevention following rapid decompression. In addition, he has produced non-scientific publications concerning altitude decompression sickness treatment, and the causes, risks, and prevention of hypocapnia in aviators. He is an Associate Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association and a board-certified aerospace physiologist.