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Marvingt Award: Lindsey McIntire

September 03, 2021

Marvingt Award: Lindsey McIntire

Established and sponsored by the French Society of Aerospace Medicine in memory of Marie Marvingt (1875-1963), a pioneer French pilot and surgical nurse who, for more than 50 years, actively and untiringly involved herself in the conception and development of air ambulance services and in the education of the general public regarding their use and benefits. The award is presented annually to honor excellence and innovation in aerospace medicine.

Lindsey K. McIntire was honored with the 2021 Marie Marvingt Award for her research excellence and innovation accomplishments over the past decade in enhancing warfighter performance through non-invasive neuromodulation techniques. Her team was the first to bring these techniques to the Department of Defense (DoD) and apply them to improving cognition. She is leading the effort to find fatigue countermeasures that last longer with fewer side effects than chemical interventions. Her research has focused on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which has been found to sustain attention during sleep deprivation and enhance arousal longer than caffeine. This could revolutionize how the DoD approaches fatigue and performance enhancement.
   Ms. McIntire is a senior research psychologist for Infoscitex, Dayton, OH, USA. She received her Master’s Degree in April 2012 and is currently attending Wright State University for a Ph.D. in Human Factors Psychology. She has been working as a full-time contractor for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) since 2007, where she has been part of various human cognitive research and performance studies. She is part of the Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) team at AFRL that uses various stimulation technologies to augment human performance in the areas of attention, arousal, learning, and fatigue.
   Most recently, Ms. McIntire has expanded this research into other novel technologies that are similar but quicker and easier to apply. She is currently leading a study funded by NASA to investigate a device that stimulates the cervical vagus nerve as a fatigue countermeasure. This device is FDA approved to treat migraines and cluster headaches and her team is the first to use this device to enhance performance in healthy individuals. Because the laboratory results of both devices have repeatedly shown large improvements in attention, learning, memory, and arousal, operational Air Force units have begun field-testing these devices to determine if they will work for training and fatigue mitigation from shift-work changes.
   Ms. McIntire is a Member of AsMA, the Aerospace Human Factors Association (AsHFA), and the Life Sciences and Biomedical Engineering Branch (LSBEB). Her awards and honors include: Cross Collaboration Team Award (711th HPW), 2016; Research and Development Innovation Award (LSBEB), 2012; and William E. Collins Award for Publication of the Year (ASHFA), 2012.