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Leverett Award: Jeremy Beer

July 01, 2022

Leverett Award: Jeremy Beer

Established in memory of Sidney D. Leverett, Jr., Ph.D., this Environmental Science Award is presented annually to an individual who has made a significant contribution in the field of environmental medicine through a publication in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, or by activities conducted in support of aerospace systems operation. Sponsored by Environmental Tectonics Corporation.

A white man with long dirty-blond hair and light mustache and beard in a dark jacket with light blue interiror stands posed against a light blue background.Jeremy Beer, Ph.D., is the 2022 recipient of the Sidney D. Leverett Environmental Science Award. The award recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution in the field of environmental sciences through a publication in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance or by activities conducted in support of aerospace systems operations. Dr.
Jeremy Beer is an Aerospace Experi mental Psychologist with KBR’s Science and Space Group at the Brooks campus in San Antonio. His research interests include human performance, sensation and perception, vehicle piloting, and spatial orientation.
   In 2017 Dr. Beer submitted three publications to our journal, two of which he was the lead researcher, and a third in
which he was a coauthor: “Cognitive deterioration in moderate and severe hypobaric hypoxia conditions” [AMHP 2017; 88(7):617-626]; “Pulmonary effects from a simulated long-duration mission in a confined cockpit” [AMHP 2017; 88(10):952-957]; and the third, “Hyperoxia and hypoxic hypoxia effects on simple and choice reaction times” [AMHP 2017; 88(12):1073-1080], with lead author Todd Dart. In addition to these, he has published at least another 19 peer-reviewed research papers. He led the planning, design, and execution of multiple research projects throughout the year, in addition to collecting human performance data. These articles spawned a series of research efforts that directly relate to
aerospace systems operations. The work he started continues to this day. Because of his expertise, he is constantly sought for professional consultation and/or guidance when issues surface dealing with aircrew hypoxia and human performance.
   After completing his undergraduate study at Princeton University, he completed his doctorate at Columbia University, where he explored moving viewers’ perception of extended scenes. His dissertation, “Deriving Position Sense from the Moving Camera,” investigated viewers’ ability to integrate optic flow over time and identified perceptual distortions resulting from lens and aperture geometry. He then completed a National Research Council fellowship at the Perception/Control of Low-Altitude Flight Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, where he mapped mathematical singularities in the optic flow field and designed a paradigm to measure effects of visual depth cues on pilots’ perception of heading and glideslope. This work confirmed that performance and safety gains can be realized from adding veridical cues to dynamic vehicle displays.
   Dr. Beer then came to Brooks to support Air Force Research Laboratory and embarked upon a research career examining human performance in aircraft, maritime, and ground vehicles. He assessed piloting performance in laser glare conditions, supported imaging studies of brain areas involved in self-motion perception, and directed a VA-sponsored Military Eye Trauma and Vision Restoration research program. When he came to KBR, he assumed responsibility for instituting a dedicated R&D component at Brooks. He designed and secured resources to conduct an integrated group of studies to investigate effects of altitude, acceleration, and lack of exercise in long cockpit missions. These studies
served as the foundation for KBR Brooks’ R&D portfolio today and are unified in their objective to identify human performance components that are vulnerable in austere operational conditions.
   Dr. Beer serves as an instructor in KBR’s Centrifuge Flight Environment Training program and has published in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Experimental Brain Research, and Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance. As an avocation, he has published creative non-fiction and commentary on topics including art, culture, vintage motorsport, and travel, and continues to serve as a reviewer for peer-reviewed journals including Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance. He remains captivated by the study of sensation and perception in myriad aspects of human life including transportation, navigation, industrial design, architecture, music, art, and cinema.