SECTION MENU

Kent K. Gillingham Award

June 28, 2019

Kent K. Gillingham Award

This award was established and sponsored by the AMST Group of Companies in Austria and the United Kingdom to honor the memory of Kent K. Gillingham, M.D., Ph.D. The award is presented annually to an individual who has made a significant contribution in the field of spatial disorientation and situational awareness related to flight.

Dwight Holland (center), accepts the Gillingham award from AsMA President Vermeiren (left) and Erich Roedig (right), representing AMST.
   Dwight Holland, MAL, M.S., MSE, M.D., Ph.D., received the 2019 Kent K. Gillingham Award. He was honored for his deep involvement with issues related to spatial disorientation/situational awareness (SD/SA). His early work included mishap database evaluation with SD/SA as contributors and assessed the cost of such mishaps. Later, he examined how fatigue in aerospace systems affected SD/SA. He redesigned and taught courses at the U.S. Navy (USN)/U.S. Air Force (USAF) Test Pilot Schools for 10 years with SD/SA as key components. He also taught an innovative course in Unmanned Aerial Systems Safety Management where SD/SA issues were highlighted. During the mid-1990s to early 2000s he and colleagues collected a series of case studies published in the well-known NASA 2012 book "Breaking the Mishap Chain." His work received widespread attention for putting together the way in which SD/SA issues blend with systems/human factors (HF) weaknesses to create an environment more conducive for mishaps to occur.
   Dr. Holland is currently President of the Life Sciences and Biomedical Engineering Branch, as well as the Past-President of the International Association of Military Flight Surgeon Pilots (IAMFSP), the Aerospace Human Factors Association, and the Space Medicine Association. He is the Founder and a Principal of his consulting business in Systems Management/Human Factors Engineering for over 20 years. A lieutenant colonel in the USAF Reserve, he has been assigned to the 311th Human Systems Wing's Performance Enhancement Division at Brooks City-Base in San Antonio, the USN and USAF Test Pilot Schools (most recently as the IMA Deputy Director for the Education Division at Edwards AFB), and now as the IMA to the Chief of the Warfighter Readiness Research Division at the 711th Human Performance Wing.
   Dr. Holland holds master’s degrees in Geophysics, Systems Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Human Factors Engineering, from Virginia Tech. He is a graduate of USAF Pilot Training and is a fully-qualified USAF Acquisitions Officer. He has also completed a Medical Doctor degree from the University of Virginia and a master’s degree with a focus in Political Science and International Relations from Hollins University. He served on a Geophysics research expedition to the Antarctic, where he managed the team’s Gravity/Magnetics program and first-ever GPS use in Antarctica for scientific study.
   Dr. Holland has served as an instructor and curriculum codeveloper in the crew systems interface area at the Navy Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, MD. He was the first-ever reserve instructor attached to the USN Test Pilot School. In the past he was assigned to the USAF Office for Scientific Research (AFOSR) as an International Program Manager, where he also served as a USAF liaison to the Office of Naval Research for Internationally-related Bioterrorism issues and represented AFOSR and the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) at the first high-level governmental anti-Bioterrorism Conference in the Western Hemisphere, and was a key S&T player in the outreach to Slovenia in 2002–2004 as it transitioned to being a NATO State. He was selected by the Secretary of the Air Force/Acquisition team to moderate brain-storming sessions on how to improve the systems engineering processes in the USAF Acquisitions system and served as the Technical Co-Chair for the largest international Systems Engineering Conference held to date. 
   Dr. Holland has over 100 academic presentations and publications to his credit, including chairing over 50 scientific sessions at international scientific meetings. He served as one of several co-authors on the article on all-night flying fatigue that received the AsMA 2005 Tuttle Award. His dissertation on dynamic peripheral visual acuity under various levels of workload and verbal intrusion earned him the 2002 Stanley N. Roscoe Award from the Aerospace Human Factors Association. He received AsMA’s Won Chuel Kay Award and the Sidney D. Leverett Award. He co-managed the firstever dedicated high G prescribed flight test with pilot physiological monitoring for different regular and advanced “full coverage” G suit models. This was nominated by the USAF Test Pilot School for the international Collins Award and won several flight test society awards for his team’s research efforts. A Fellow of AsMA, he has served on the AsMA Council and Executive Committee, was the chair of the Awards Committee, a member of the Nominating Committee, and has served on the AsMA Scientific Program Committee for over 20 years.